Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi’s Musica per commenti sonori: Tecnologia elettronica (1986) Costanza Records (Reissue 1992 Fonit Cetra)

Among several projects Stefano Torossi and pianist-composer Amedeo Tommasi have collaborated upon in their career is an experimental electronica album, Musica per commenti sonori: Tecnologia elettronica on Costanza Records.

Musica Per Commenti Sonori: Tecnologia Elettronica (1986)

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi – Musica per commenti sonori: Tecnologia elettronica (1986) Costanza Records

The LP was recorded at Studio 81 in Rome in 1986.

“Energia,” the eight cut on the original release, is on YouTube:

Featuring tracks such as “Digital Delay,” “Moto contrastante,” “Microlaser,” and “Robotico,” the album of original compositions was later reissued as part of the Commenti Musicali series under the title, Commenti musicali: Microtecnologia – tecnologia e Computer. The hard-to-find Fonit Cetra CD added ten extra tracks to the dozen on the original Costanza version.

“Fantatecnologia,” a track from the 1992 expanded CD reissue, is on YouTube:

Stefano Torossi and Amedeo Tommasi recorded their first album together, Musica per commenti sonori, also in 1986. This LP features twelve tracks including  “Delizie,” “Bombardona,” “Disneyland,” and “Capitomboli.”

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi - Musica per commenti sonori Costanza Records [Italy] CO 8601

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi – Musica per commenti sonori (1986) Costanza Records

“Sogni d’oro” from Musica per commenti sonori, a track that later appeared both on Strumentali: Bambini (1989) and Commenti musicali: Young Music – Young Ideas (1993) is here:

Three years later, Italy’s Fonit Cetra reissued the first Musica per commenti sonori album, retaining the identical running order and playing time on an album titled Strumentali: Bambini.

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi - Strumentali: Bambini (1989)

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi – Strumentali: Bambini (1989) Fonit Cetra

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi composed another original album for Costanza in 1986, Musica per commenti sonori: L’uomo e la natura featuring a dozen original compositions.

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi - Musica per commenti sonori: L'uomo e la natura (1986) Costanza Records

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi – Musica per commenti sonori: L’uomo e la natura (1986) Costanza Records

This was also reissued by Fonit Cetra as part of their Nuovo Repertorio Editoriale series, Strumentali: L’uomo e la natura in 1989, retaining the same track order.

Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi’s “Camel Trophy” from Strumentali: L’uomo e la natura: is on YouTube:

In 1988, Tommasi and Torossi teamed up to work on Children’s World, a compilation album by Primrose Music.

Sandro Brugnolini, Claudio Gizzi, Claudio Maioli, Leandro Piccioni, Antonio Sechi, Amedeo Tommasi, and Stefano Torossi - Children's World (2008) Primrose Music (PRCD 012)

Children’s World (1988) Primrose Music

Amedeo Tommasi Joined the Chet Baker Sextet in 1961

Another of the distinguished musicians and composers to collaborate with Stefano Torossi, Amedeo Tommasi has been playing piano since age 6. In the late 1950s he began playing in jazz trios around Italy and then joined Chet Baker in 1961, a relationship that would span decades. In 1962, Tommassi joined a group of stellar players on Baker’s landmark RCA album, Chet Is Back!

Chet Baker Sextet - Chet Is Back! (1962)

Chet Baker Sextet – Chet Is Back! (1962) RCA

“Ballata in forma di blues,” an original composition by Tommasi from Chet Is Back! featuring Baker on trumpet, Daniel Humair on drums, Bobby Jaspar on tenor saxophone and flute, René Thomas on guitar, Amedeo Tommasi on piano, and Benoit Quersin on bass is here:

Among a treasure trove of photos found on Amedeo Tommasi’s MySpace.com site is this one of Chet Baker and Amedeo Tommasi in the 1960s:

Chet Baker and Amedeo Tommasi in the early 1960s (photo from Tommasi's MySpace.com site)

Chet Baker and Amedeo Tommasi in the early 1960s (photo from Tommasi’s MySpace.com site)

A 24-minute clip of the Chet Baker Quintet including Baker on trumpet, Bruno Biriaco on drums, Jacques Pelzer on flute, Amedeo Tommasi on piano, and Giovanni Tommaso on bass live in Rome in 1976 is on YouTube:

In 1967, Amedeo Tommasi, bassist Giovanni Tommaso, and drummer Enzo Restuccia released Blues For Miles Davis, which has recently been reissued in CD.

Amedeo Tommasi Trio - Blues For Miles Davis (1967)

Amedeo Tommasi Trio – Blues For Miles Davis (1967) (Reissue 2009) Cinedelic

The title track from Blues For Miles Davis is here:

Prolific Film, TV, and Production Music Career Began in the Late 1960s

After touring with Chet Baker and a number of notable musicians through the Sixties, Tomassi like Stefano Torossi began devoting more time to composing original music for film and TV including some classic library music tracks.

A clip from the 1967 Roger Corman film The Trip that uses Amedeo Tommasi’s “Hyperspace” has been uploaded to the Internet:

An example of a library music track is this 1969 Tommasi composition, “Fashion Beat”

And here’s a tune from 1970, this one featuring the legendary vocalist Edda Dell’Orso on “Thomas”–reissued in 2017 by SONOR Music Editions:

In 1974, Amedeo Tommasi released The Sound, an LP that was reissued in both CD and as a download in 2007. Besides making several albums with Stefano Torossi in the 1980s, Amedeo Tommasi continues to create original electronic-based pieces of music for Ennio Morricone, a musical enterprise that has now lasted more than two decades.

Amedeo Tommasi - The Sound (1974) (2007 Reissue)

Amedeo Tommasi – The Sound (1974) (Reissue 2007) Cenacolo

Amedeo Tommasi’s “Brasilia” from The Sound is here:

Actively Composing and Performing in 2014

A selection of tracks from Amedeo Tommasi including “Dinamica tragica” from his 2012 Flash internazionale album for Pinball Records, currently available as a download, is on SoundCloud:

Both Amadeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi continue to make music in 2014. Here’s a trailer for director Roberto De Vivo’s “Amedeo Tommasi: Musicalmente vostro,” which includes a fascinating, must-see recent interview of Amedeo Tommasi:

And something very special, a video performance clip uploaded by Amedeo Tomassi in January 2014:

A compilation of the music of Amedeo Tommasi that touches jazz, library music, electronica, and soundtracks among other genres and starts off with a live performance by Tommassi, Giovanni Tommaso, and Franco Mondini in 2012 can be found here:

And here’s a four-track video EP for Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi’s Microtecnologia: Tecnologia e Computer (1992) that includes one original track from 1986 and three from 1992:

Download: Amedeo Tommasi and Stefano Torossi’s Microtecnologia: Tecnologia e Computer (1992)

In 1992, Italian record label Fonit Cetra released Microtecnologia: Tecnologia e Computer, the latest installment of their Commenti Musicali series of albums. This CD reissue contained the whole Musica per commenti sonori: Tecnologia elettronica LP as well as ten bonus tracks. Currently out of print and very difficult if not impossible to find, a reference MP3 version is currently available at Dusty Shelf, a website specializing in sharing rare and out of print 70s and 80s production music records. To access this album, click the cover.

Tecnologia e Computer (1992) Fonit Cetra (CDFC 4025)

Amedeo Tommasi – Commenti musicali: Microtecnologia – tecnologia e Computer – (1992) Fonit Cetra/Rai Trade

About Formosa Coweater

writer based in the Pacific Rim

Posted on 13 February 2014, in Album Spotlight and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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