The Fast Machine’s The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records by Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso)

Around 1973, Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso), composed the music for The Fast Machine’s eponymous album release on the short-lived Italian label Picci Records. The Fast Machine‘s exact year of release is not clear, either 1972 or 1973. Credited to “Complesso The Fast Machine,” it seems most of the instruments were played by Dell’Orso himself.

The Fast Machine - The Fast Machine (1972~1973) Picci

The Fast Machine – The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records

The collection of funk, jazz, and rock instrumentals by Osar Lindok (better known as Giacomo Dell’Orso) includes “Born To Love You,” “Physical Discomfort,” “Men Must Be Ashamed,” “Highway South,” “She Kissed Me Once Too Much,” and “That Son of a Gun” on Side A and “My Valley Was Green,” “Shrimps and Champagne,” “Don’t Blame This World,” “Midwestern Party,” “The Days We’ll Never Know” on the reverse side.

The Fast Machine - The Fast Machine (1972-1973) Picci back

The Fast Machine – The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records back

More than half the tracks feature a moog synthesizer. This may even be one of the first Mini Moogs to be used in the genre of Italian soundtrack and library music as Giacomo Dell’Orso was a pioneer in the use of various type of synthesizers. In fact, he used one of the the first expensive Emulators and even invented his own musical instrument in this time period. The albums production is credited to Redo Lucchetti and label founder Pino Cassia.

The Fast Machine’s “Born To Love You,” the opening track, was composed by Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso), plus an uncredited Giancarlo De Bellis and Victor Pagano according to the official S.I.A.E. database:

Note: If any legal rights holders object to the posting of this rare, out of print, and unavailable track ripped from this correspondent’s personal collection, please drop a line and it will be removed immediately.

The Fast Machine is one of a handful of one-off groups Giacomo Dell’Orso was involved in in the early 1970s. One of the first was The Revelations, who released their eponymous album on the Help! label in 1971. The album was produced by Proluton, who is otherwise known as Gianni Dell’Orso, the younger brother of Giacomo Dell’Orso.

The Revelations - The Revelations (1971) Help!

The Revelations – The Revelations (1971) Help!

Hard to find and highly collectible, The Revelations album, features three compositions by Lindok, four by Proluton, and three compositions from guitar great Silvano Chimenti.

The Fast Machine - The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records label A

The Fast Machine – The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records label A

In 2013, The Revelations album was reissued by Schema, part of the Ishtar famliy of labels, in both vinyl and CD format.

The Fast Machine’s “Men Must Be Ashamed,” composed by Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso) plus an uncredited Franco Bonfanti and Giorgio Sabelli, is on SoundCloud:

Note: If any legal rights holders object to the posting of this rare, out of print, and unavailable track ripped from this correspondent’s personal collection, please drop a line and it will be removed immediately.

In 1972, Giacomo Dell’Orso, Gianni Dell’Orso, and Nico Fidenco formed The Fine Machine and released Habitat on CAM Records. The dozen compositions are credited to Proluton, Oscar Lindok, and Donimak, with Nico Fidenco using his full “Peter Donimak” alias for the production credit.

The Fine Machine - Habitat (1972) CAM Records

The Fine Machine – Habitat (1972) CAM Records

Like The Fast Machine’s self-titled album, The Fine Machine offers an eclectic mix of funk, jazz, and rock. A closer look at this exceptional album, reissued in vinyl by Cinedelic Records in 2016, which also includes a guest vocal by Edda Dell’Orso, the wife of Giacomo, is on this site under the albums category at the top of the page.

The Fine Machine - Habitat (1972) CAM

The Fine Machine – Habitat (1972) CAM Records

Both of the original LPs on CAM (Creazioni Artistiche Musicali) Records, one of the first Italian labels to focus on releasing film music, were pressed in limited numbers and are not easy to find these days although copies occasionally appear at music sites such as Discogs and the like.

The Fast Machine’s “Highway South,” composed by Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso) plus an uncredited Gino Pittoni, is online:

Note: If any legal rights holders object to the posting of this rare, out of print, and unavailable track ripped from this correspondent’s personal collection, please drop a line and it will be removed immediately.

The same year, Giacomo Dell’Orso, Gianni Dell’Orso, and Nico Fidenco formed The Fine Machine they created another one-off group, Oscar Lindok’s Orchestra. Again, the twelve compositions on their The Rhythm Of Life album are shared among the trio of Donimak, Lindok, and Proluton, with Peter Donimak producing.

Oscar Lindok's Orchestra - The Rhythm Of Life (1973) CAM

Oscar Lindok’s Orchestra – The Rhythm Of Life (1973) CAM Records

This time uncredited guest vocalist Edda Dell’Orso appears on half of the tracks. In addition, Alessandro Alessandroni contributes vocals and Sandro Brugnolini and Stefano Torossi are both listed as uncredited composers. See the albums section above for profiles of albums by Stefano Torossi made with Edda Dell’Orso, Alessandro Alessandroni, and Sandro Brugnolini, as well as an exclusive interview with Edda Dell’Orso HERE.

The Fast Machine - The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records label B

The Fast Machine – The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records label B

Like The Fine Machine’s Habitat, CAM Records released two different versions of the cover. A closer look at this impossible-to-find, out of print album, a prime candidate for a future reissue, is on this site under albums at the top of the page.

The Fast Machine’s “Don’t Blame This World,” composed by Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso) plus an uncredited Gino Pittoni, is on SoundCloud:

Note: If any legal rights holders object to the posting of this rare, out of print, and unavailable track ripped from this correspondent’s personal collection, please drop a line and it will be removed immediately.

When asked recently what he recalls about the making of albums like The Fast Machine and The Fine Machine’s Habit in the early 1970s, Giacomo Dell’Orso comments:

Not a lot. I do remember a whole album was completed within a couple of days. We did not view it as being too important at the time.

Giacomo Dell'Orso (photo from discogs.com)

Giacomo Dell’Orso (photo from discogs.com)

From what I remember, the music on The Fast Machine album is mine. And the instruments are real, as was the case in those days.

Regarding the origin of some of the colorful song titles:

In a situation like this, the music is often not paired with a specific film or project. The titles were given later, sometimes by the publisher. This offered a lot of latitude for the creative use of composition titles.

On the iconic album cover that was re-used on more than half a dozen library music releases:

The cover photo is mine.

Besides The Fast Machine in 1973, Picci Records released Oscar Lindok And His Friends’ Come Upstair. The album, more rock-oriented than his earlier material, features an uncredited Sandro Brugnolini on each of the dozen tracks. Whether Gianni Dell’Orso, and Nico Fidenco participated is unclear.

Oscar Lindok and His Friends - Come Upstair (1973) Picci

Oscar Lindok and His Friends – Come Upstair (1973) Picci Records

The previous year, Giacomo Dell’Orso composed the music for My Favourite Tones, a Picci Records’ album that includes nine of twelve tracks by Orchestra di Giacomo Dell’Orso.

Orchestra Mario Migliardi, Giacomo Dell'Orso, and Claudio Gizzi - My Favourite Tones (1972) Picci Records

Orchestra Mario Migliardi, Giacomo Dell’Orso, and Claudio Gizzi – My Favourite Tones (1972) Picci Records

This album by Picci Records, like The Fast Machine and Come Upstair, has been out of print for more than 40 years.

A playlist that collects all of the available tracks from The Fast Machine’s self-titled album currently found online, including “Born To Love You,” “Don’t Blame This World,” “High Wind,” “Men Must Be Ashamed,” and “Highway South,” is on SoundCloud:

2017 Remaster of Stati d’animo, Vol. 2 with Nico Fidenco and Giacomo Dell’Orso

The same year CAM Records released a full album of compositions by Giacomo Dell’Orso and Nico Fidenco, Stati d’animo Vol. 1: Situazioni varie, as well. The ten tracks are credited to the two composers using a combination of their actual names and multiple aliases, including “D. Colarossi” aka “Domenico Colarossi,” the real name of “Nico Fidenco” and “Donimak.”

Donimak (aka Nico Fidenco) in the 1970s (photo from Discogs)

Nico Fidenco (aka Donimak or Peter Donimak) in the 1970s (photo from Discogs)

This LP has yet to be reissued, and like all of these early 1970s releases, was intended for use as background music in films, television, and radio productions. Consequently, the albums were pressed in limited numbers of no more than 100 or 200 copies apiece. None of the tracks are currently available online.

Various Artists - Stati d'animo Vol. 1 - Situazioni varie (1973) CAM Records

Various Artists – Stati d’animo Vol. 1 – Situazioni varie (1973) CAM Records

However, the second volume of this album that CAM released, which features four compositions officially attributed to Donimak, plus others to an uncredited Giacomo Dell’Orso, and Donimak under the name Nico Fideno, has just been remastered from the original TT Stereo master tapes by SONOR Music Editions in a limited vinyl edition. The compositions from Donimak include “Vocal Theme,” “Action Feeling,” “Dedicated To Beatles,” and “Industrial Feeling.”

The remastered version of Donimak (aka Nico Fidenco)’s “Action Feeling” from Stati d’animo Vol. 2: Situazioni e ambienti di ogni genere has recently been uploaded to YouTube:

Composer Aldo Tamborrelli (aka Ghein) contributes five tracks to the compilation including “Psyco Feeling,” “Ritmic Feeling,” “Young Feeling,” “Indian Feeling,” and “Obsession Feeling.” The album also features a pair of cuts by composer Nicoletta Bozzai, using her Morfina alias, “Celestial Feeling” and “Mondo di domani.”

Various Artists - Stati d'animo Vol. 2 - Situazioni e ambienti di ogni genere (1973) CAM Records

Various Artists – Stati d’animo Vol. 2 – Situazioni e ambienti di ogni genere (1973) CAM Records

The remastered Stati d’animo Vol. 2: Situazioni e ambienti di ogni genere album is now available from select music retailers specializing in sound library and film music.

Various Artists - Stati d'animo Vol. 2 - Situazioni e ambienti di ogni genere (2017 Remaster) SONOR Music Editions (1973)

Various Artists – Stati d’animo Vol. 2 – Situazioni e ambienti di ogni genere (2017 Remaster) SONOR Music Editions (1973)

Note if purchased from SONOR Music Editions directly, a high-quality download in MP3, FLAC, and other formats is also included.

Donimak (aka Nico Fidenco)’s composition “Vocal Theme” is online:

Three Giacomo Dell’Orso Releases in 2016

In 2016, Giacomo Dell’Orso released his latest album, Concerto di Natale: Canti tradizionali. The collection of traditional Christmas songs was released as a digital download by his longtime Italian label Edizioni Paoline.

Giacomo Dell'Orso - Concerto di Natale - Canti tradizionali (2016) Paoline

Giacomo Dell’Orso – Concerto di Natale – Canti tradizionali (2016) Paoline

Experienced in the liturgy and Gregorian chants, Giacomo Dell’Orso made a number of religious themed albums for the same label in the late 1970s including Un bel mattino – Canti per catechesi e celebrazioni d’iniziazione Cristiana, E’ bello dar lode a dip – 12 Salmi per la catches e le celebration dei ragazzi, and Come omni donna – Nuove canzoni all Madonna, as well as Canterò a Cristo and Israele Canta in 1979, both with Anna Maria Galliano.

The Fine Machine - Habitat (2016 Reissue) Cinedelic Records (1972)

The Fine Machine – Habitat (2016 Reissue) Cinedelic Records (1972)

Besides reissuing The Fine Machine’s Habitat, with Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso), Proluton (aka Gianni Dell’Orso), and Donimak (aka Nico Fidenco) plus an uncredited Edda Dell’Orso, in limited edition vinyl format, Italy’s Cinedelic Records released a second limited edition vinyl featuring Giacomo Dell’Orso, A me stesso con simpatia.

Giacomo Dell'Orso - A me stesso con simpatia (2016 Reissue) Cinedelic Records (1975)

Giacomo Dell’Orso – A me stesso con simpatia (2016 Reissue) Cinedelic Records (1975)

Musicians on the easy listening jazz album, originally released by Ellecci, include Ciro Cocozza on drums and percussion, Nino Rapicavoli on flute and saxophone, Jimmy Tamborrelli on guitar, and Giacomo Dell’Orso on organ, piano, and electric piano.

Giacomo Dell’Orso’s “Hippy più che mai,” written by Franco Bonfanti, and an uncredited Dell’Orso, Gino Pittoni, and Giorgio Sabelli, is on YouTube:

Identical Image Used By Three Labels On Eight LP Covers

If the cover for The Fast Machine seems vaguely familiar, it is. In fact, this correspondent has seen the identical album used by three record labels! An incomplete list of albums sharing this cover includes two more by Picci Records: Vasco (Vassil Kojucharov)’s Interspaziale and Ritmi e suoni–a closer look at this latter release, which is said to feature an uncredited Stefano Torossi, is on this site.

Vasco - Interspaziale (1973) Picci Records

Vasco – Interspaziale (1973) Picci Records

Ellecci Records, a sister label of Picci Records, used the identical cover for at least four albums, as well, including Vasco’s Thrilling Soundtrack and M. Vasco and Franco Bonfanti’s An ghin go, plus Alvaro E. Filippo’s Guitars Cocktail in 1975 and Fogu, Moseholm, and Binsy’s Los Mariposas album in 1976.

Alvaro E. Filippo - Guitars Cocktail (1975) Ellecci

Alvaro E. Filippo – Guitars Cocktail (1975) Ellecci

Guitars Cocktail, an album by the guitar duo Alvaro Pieranunzi and Filippo Rizzuto, is also said to feature four tracks by an uncredited Giacomo Dell’Orso as well as three by Sandro Brugnolini.

Vasco - Thrilling Soundtrack (1975) Ellecci

Vasco – Thrilling Soundtrack (1975) Ellecci

The Thrilling Soundtrack LP features a pair of tracks by an uncredited Stefano Torossi.

Vassil “Vasco” Kojucharov and Stefano Torossi’s “Mascelle d’acciaio” from Thrilling Soundtrack is on YouTube:

A third label, Flippermusic’s Nuova Idea, used the familiar image on the cover for Corvasce and Rosciglione’s Con Brio album in 1975, as well. This album, like the others targeting the soundtrack and library music market, was released in limited numbers and never reissued.

Corvasce and Rosciglione - Con Brio (1975) Nuova Idea

Corvasce and Rosciglione – Con Brio (1975) Nuova Idea

Each of the ten compositions on Umberto Corvasce and Giorgio Rosciglione’s album features an uncredited Giacomo Dell’Orso and Nicoletta Bozzai. Officially, seven were composed by Corvasce and Rosciglione, with Antonino Scuderi doing the other three.

Fogu, Moseholm, Binsy - Los Mariposas (1976) Ellecci

Fogu, Moseholm, Binsy – Los Mariposas (1976) Ellecci

Antonino Scuderi is also one of the composers of the 1973 Octopus Records’ Bass Modulations, with Roberto Conrado and Piero Montanari, an album profiled on this site.

Umberto Corvasce and Giorgio Rosciglione’s “Mixer,” “Soul Nanygo,” and “Bass Theme,” composed by Rosciglione and an uncredited Giacomo Dell’Orso and Nicoletta Bozzai, are online:

A closer look at some highlights from the remarkable musical career of Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso) including his prolific partnership with longtime musical partner Donimak (aka Nico Fidenco), is found in an exclusive interview HERE.

Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso) Online Audio Sampler

Oscar Lindok's Orchestra - The Rhythm Of Life (1972) CAM

Oscar Lindok’s Orchestra – The Rhythm Of Life (1972) CAM Records

An audio sampler of the music of Oscar Lindok (aka Giacomo Dell’Orso) currently found on SoundCloud includes:

  • Oscar Lindok’s Orchestra’s “Flying About” from The Rhythm Of Life (1972) CAM Records
  • The Fine Machine’s “Crazy Eel,” “Shut Paranoia,” “Hand Shake,” “Raging Beat,” “Wait For Me,” “Obsessing Promenade,” and “Skin-Deep” from Habitat (1972) CAM Records
  • The Fast Machine’s “Born To Love You,” “Don’t Blame This World,” “High Wind,” “Men Must Be Ashamed,” and “Highway South,” from The Fast Machine (1973) Picci Records
  • Oscar Lindok and His Friends’ “My Way To Mexico,” “Let’s Go To Manhattan” and “Chopin In Paris” from Come Upstair (1973) Picci Records
  • Lindok’s “Lipari,” “Vulcano,” “Ustica,” “Egadi,” and “Marettimo” from Eruzioni (1974) Fly Record
  • Oscar Lindok’s “Nerves” from Moderno Beat Vol. 2 (Various Images) (1976) Cinevox Record

Coming Soon: MacQueen feat. Rino de Filippi, Gianfranco Giacomo Reverberi, Giuliano Sorgini, and Edda Dell’Orso

This site will profile the 1971 Leo Records’ MacQueen promotional compilation album that features tracks by Rino de Filippi, Salvatore D’Esposito and Tito Manilo, Gino Redi and Nisa (aka Nicola Salerno), and a guest vocal by Edda Dell’Orso on Side A, with two compositions by Ninety (aka Gianfranco Giacomo Reverberi) performed by The Psycheground Group (which in actuality were the musicians from the progressive rock band Nuova Idea) and two by Giuliano Sorgini on side B. Sandro Brugnolini and Stefano Torossi are listed as uncredited composers on the Reverberi tracks.

Oggi & Domani - MacQueen (early 1970s) Leo Records cover

Various Artists – MacQueen (1971) Leo Records

The limited-run promo was commissioned by clothing manufacturer Double Dacron, a fairly common practice in this time period. The music was licensed from popular releases at the time. For example, two tracks came from The Psycheground Group’s Psychedelic and Underground Music album from Lupus Records released the same year and two were taken from Giuliano Sorgini’s Under Pompelmo, which wasn’t actually released until 1973.

alternative inside cover for Beppe Carta and Stefano Torossi's Fantasia Musicale (early 1970s) Metropole Records

alternative inside cover for Beppe Carta and Stefano Torossi’s Fantasia Musicale (early 1970s) Metropole Records

Around the same time frame, Stefano Torossi’s Fantasia Musicale album may also have been released as a promo by Double Dacron. This is not entirely clear, however, as the track listing on the special release does not correlate with the correct rundown on the original Metropole Records album. Several of these versions have appeared at auction sites in recent years although the composer, Stefano Torossi, has no knowledge of the supposed Double Dacron release.

The Psycheground Group’s “Psycheground,” composed by Ninety (aka Gianfranco Giacomo Reverberi) and performed by the musicians from Nuova Idea, is here:

About Formosa Coweater

writer based in the Pacific Rim

Posted on 1 February 2017, in Album Spotlight and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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